Introduction to Industry 4.0

We are at a unique time in history when technology is offering tremendous opportunities for companies

~1760s
revo-img-01
1st Industrial Revolution
Steam and hydro power, mechanical production
~8-9x
increase in GDP for established economies1
~1870s
revo-img-02
2nd Industrial Revolution
Division of labor, electricity, mass production
~1.5-2x
increase in GDP for established economies2
~1960s
revo-img-03
3rd Industrial Revolution
Electronics, computers, early automation
~1.3-2x
increase in GDP for established economies3
~2010s to now
revo-img-04
4th Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0)
Digital technology embedded in the physical world
Economic impact could rival 1st Industrial Revolution, especially with
~50bn machines and ~1bn people connected
  • 1. E.g. UK average GDP growth of 0.33% from 1500 – 1760, compared to 2.9% from 1760 – 1811
  • 2. E.g. U.S. average GDP growth of 3% from 1860 – 1870, compared to 5% from 1870 – 1900
  • 3. E.g. U.S. average GDP growth of 6% from 1950 – 1960, compared to 8% from 1960 – 1990

Overview of Industry 4.0

Industry 4.0 is characterised by four types of technology

i4-connectivity
Connectivity

Examples:

  • Sensors
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Cloud technology
  • Blockchain
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~50bn machines

could be connected through technology by 2030.

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i4-intelligence
INTELLIGENCE

Examples:

  • Advanced Analytics and Machine Learning
  • Artificial Intelligence
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$1.2 to $3.7tn

value from Internet of Things (IoT) in factories through process optimisation and predictive maintenance.

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i4-automation
Automation

Examples:

  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Robotics and Automation (collaborative robots, autonomous guided vehicles)
  • Robotic Process Automation and Chatbots
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50% of activities

at the workplace have the technical potential to be automated.

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i4-engineering
ADVANCED ENGINEERING

Examples:

  • Additive Manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing)
  • Renewable Energy
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allows more complex components to be designed and produced through new production methods or materials.

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These technologies are applicable to manufacturing and all across the value chain